Stacking the Deck 2018

In this studio style session, participants will collaboratively design, draw and assemble a shared toolkit in the form of a deck of cards reflecting aspects of their own self-care regarding their learning and teaching practices.

How can instructors take care for their students, if they do not first take care for themselves? This is the first assessment all emergency first responders must make, and should be the case for instructors as well. In this increasingly complex world, staying mindful of personal and professional priorities is strewn with challenges, but many of these challenges we all share, some are in effect universal.

01 – Outside
01 – Outside

Take an office meeting outside. go for a walk and just talk to each other.

02 – River
02 – River
03 – Day
03 – Day
04 – Sudoko
04 – Sudoko
05 – Excersice
05 – Excersice

Early morning run in the forest with friends

06 – Piano
06 – Piano

Unwinding by playing the piano
Using Music/playing instruments to release stress. No Judgement, any song – as long as you want/

07 – Dream
07 – Dream

Mindful connection to my heart in nature.

08 – Friends
08 – Friends

Body movement with friends in nature.

09 – Passions
09 – Passions

Set boundaries and hold yourself accountable to these.
Invest in yourself and your passions.
eg. Turn off work email for the weekend and make space for yourself.

10 – Water
10 – Water

Be at peace
On the water
In my Kayak
With mountain in the background
cares and concerns and troubles disappear

11 – Self care
11 – Self care

Self care tips

12 – Meditate
12 – Meditate
13 – Present
13 – Present

Get lost in the woods
No judgement in nature
Accept yourself, how it is right now

14 – Alone
14 – Alone

Alone time
Cup of tea
Book of significance (not scholarly)

Visual iconographies attempt to convey meanings that are also universal. Whether it’s a sports brands’ swoosh, a religious denomination, an emoji in your text message or to gender identify public washrooms, we engage with these sorts of ‘visual shorthand’ daily. We use them to convey complex information to each other, and we are well equipped to use such visual iconography in our own daily practices in the home, office or classroom.

Card decks are a popular product for facilitation, storytelling and play. (Eg. Group Works deck, Dixit Cards, Tarot cards etc) They allow users a multitude of affordances from the “drawing a card” to more complex and customizable interactions. In this way they are ideal for daily reflections that can be guided with random and serendipitous results.

Dr Jessica Motherwell and Jason Toal facilitate a generative card building activity with a series of techniques. Known as a graphic or icon ‘jam’, participants will first have the opportunity to visually explore some universal themes they experience when taking care for themselves in the classroom. Visuals are shared and discussed in an anonymous gallery walk, and sorted by the group. Through iteration and using several Liberating Structures techniques, the visuals will be compiled and synthesized to best represent the most relevant self-care themes of the group. Each participant will contribute at least one card to the final deck, and have the opportunity to download, print and assemble their own deck as an open educational resource.

Connection to research literature

iconography, which, as described by Panofsky, is an approach to studying the content and meaning of works of art that is primarily focused on classifying, establishing dates, provenance and other necessary fundamental knowledge concerning the subject matter of an artwork that is needed for further interpretation.[3]